Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us. (Neil Degrasse Tyson)

(Source: wildstag)

policymic:

Google Street View now lets you look into the past

A new addition to Google’s Street View product, which launched in 2007, allows you to look back in time and see how any given street’s surroundings have changed since the implementation of the project. And the results can be pretty eye-opening, showing everything from gentrification to the impact of natural disasters.

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Rana Plaza: New Norms in Garment Factory Production?

pulitzercenter:

image

On the afternoon of April 23, 2013, workers at the Rana Plaza offices of BRAC Bank were concerned about recent cracks that had appeared in the walls of the building. Their manager ordered tellers to complete transactions they were working on and promptly evacuate. Hours later, the building…

(Source: icly)

we are one!
we are the exo fandom!

(Source: xiumania)

fokjayolandi:

Die Antwoord before Die Antwoord

fokjayolandi:

Die Antwoord before Die Antwoord

humans-of-pdx:

Achilles. (Part 2 of 2)“I was a boxer from the age of 5 to 37. Unfortunately, I was forced to retire.” “What happened?”“I was run over by a car making a blind left turn.” He listed off the injuries to his back, neck, shoulders and knees. “They told me if I wasn’t so strong it would’ve killed me. But I had a good career. I trained under one of the best trainers in the world, and up against some great fighters.”“Do you work now?” “No. Well, I sell Street Roots, and, well… it’s a job and I’m glad to have it. I’d love to work other jobs, but with my disabilities, no employer wants to take on the risk of me injuring myself on the job and then having to pay workers comp. But I’m getting ready to leave Portland soon. I’ve got house in Wyoming that I bought when I was 17, and I’ll never go back to live there so I might as well sell it, and… ““Wait, you bought a house when you were 17?”“Yeah, my girlfriend at the time was pregnant with triplets and my dad helped us out and bought the land and we bought a mobile home on the property.”“You have triplets?” “We were going to have triplets. My girlfriend and I broke up for about the thousandth time while she was pregnant, and she was dating this other guy, and then things went badly. He pushed her out of a car going 40 miles an hour when she was seven months pregnant. Two of the babies died.”“Wow.”“But my son, he’s 36 now and he’s great. He was such an easy baby…I was the one to get up with him in the middle of the night. His mom and I had this great system worked out. I got her go back to school because she was waitressing and I knew at least one of us needed an education. So I’d watch him in the morning while she took classes and then she’d have him all afternoon while I worked. And then I’d take him on the weekends. I would tell his mom, ‘You go. This is boy time for watching football and boxing.’ So she had a lot of free time and that was great for her. She was so protective of him though. One time he threw a stick at a tree and it bounced back and cut his eye and of course she got upset and I was like, ‘It’s fine! He’s a boy, he’s going to get bruises and cuts and broken bones. If you shelter him from doing those things he’s going to grow up to be the most boring person in the world.’ She thought my ideas about parenting were screwball.”I interrupted him for a moment to point out a pigeon walking nearby with an obvious limp. “Weren’t you just telling me about a bird with a broken foot?”“Oh, yeah. I feed that bird on a regular basis, so he comes around when he sees me. I brought him a bagel today.”

humans-of-pdx:

Achilles. (Part 2 of 2)

“I was a boxer from the age of 5 to 37. Unfortunately, I was forced to retire.” 

“What happened?”

“I was run over by a car making a blind left turn.” He listed off the injuries to his back, neck, shoulders and knees. “They told me if I wasn’t so strong it would’ve killed me. But I had a good career. I trained under one of the best trainers in the world, and up against some great fighters.”

“Do you work now?” 

“No. Well, I sell Street Roots, and, well… it’s a job and I’m glad to have it. I’d love to work other jobs, but with my disabilities, no employer wants to take on the risk of me injuring myself on the job and then having to pay workers comp. But I’m getting ready to leave Portland soon. I’ve got house in Wyoming that I bought when I was 17, and I’ll never go back to live there so I might as well sell it, and… “

“Wait, you bought a house when you were 17?”

“Yeah, my girlfriend at the time was pregnant with triplets and my dad helped us out and bought the land and we bought a mobile home on the property.”

“You have triplets?” 

“We were going to have triplets. My girlfriend and I broke up for about the thousandth time while she was pregnant, and she was dating this other guy, and then things went badly. He pushed her out of a car going 40 miles an hour when she was seven months pregnant. Two of the babies died.”

“Wow.”

“But my son, he’s 36 now and he’s great. He was such an easy baby…I was the one to get up with him in the middle of the night. His mom and I had this great system worked out. I got her go back to school because she was waitressing and I knew at least one of us needed an education. So I’d watch him in the morning while she took classes and then she’d have him all afternoon while I worked. And then I’d take him on the weekends. I would tell his mom, ‘You go. This is boy time for watching football and boxing.’ So she had a lot of free time and that was great for her. She was so protective of him though. One time he threw a stick at a tree and it bounced back and cut his eye and of course she got upset and I was like, ‘It’s fine! He’s a boy, he’s going to get bruises and cuts and broken bones. If you shelter him from doing those things he’s going to grow up to be the most boring person in the world.’ She thought my ideas about parenting were screwball.”

I interrupted him for a moment to point out a pigeon walking nearby with an obvious limp. “Weren’t you just telling me about a bird with a broken foot?”

“Oh, yeah. I feed that bird on a regular basis, so he comes around when he sees me. I brought him a bagel today.”

humans-of-pdx:

Achilles (Part 1 of 2).It was hailing. I found refuge from under a structure in Firefighters Park and found Achilles reading a western novel. We made small talk and watched people run by, trying to escape the downpour. “Do you read a lot of westerns?” 
“Oh, not necessarily. I’ll read anything.” 
“What character do you relate to most out of any book you’ve ever read?”  

“Probably Achilles from The Iliad.” 
“By the same name? Is that a self-given name then?” 
“No. My parents let my grandma name me. All my siblings have normal names and then my parents let my half-senile grandma name me Achilles. Kids gave me a hard time about it when I was in school, but then once I read the book, I was like, ‘Wow, he’s a pretty strong guy,’ and I brought a copy of the book to school and convinced the other kids that it was cool until they left me alone.” He went on to tell me volumes about Achilles, the Spartans, Julius and Augustus Caesar, Cleopatra and the discrepancies between the real histories of Greek, Rome and Egypt and the way blockbuster movies portray them. The man was a living history book.
“You have so much knowledge!” 
“I read a lot. When I was a kid I was diagnosed with ADHD and I told my dad I didn’t like the way the medication made me feel, so he told me I didn’t have to take it. I remember my dad pointing out a bird with a broken foot, and he told me, ‘See that bird? You don’t see him begging. Even though he has a disability, he doesn’t ask for help from anyone. He just finds a way.’ So I decided that I was going to train myself to read for an hour every day to help myself focus. My dad got me an egg timer, and it was really hard, but I made it happen. I read everything now.”

humans-of-pdx:

Achilles (Part 1 of 2).

It was hailing. I found refuge from under a structure in Firefighters Park and found Achilles reading a western novel. We made small talk and watched people run by, trying to escape the downpour. “Do you read a lot of westerns?”

“Oh, not necessarily. I’ll read anything.”

“What character do you relate to most out of any book you’ve ever read?”  

“Probably Achilles from The Iliad.”

“By the same name? Is that a self-given name then?”

“No. My parents let my grandma name me. All my siblings have normal names and then my parents let my half-senile grandma name me Achilles. Kids gave me a hard time about it when I was in school, but then once I read the book, I was like, ‘Wow, he’s a pretty strong guy,’ and I brought a copy of the book to school and convinced the other kids that it was cool until they left me alone.” He went on to tell me volumes about Achilles, the Spartans, Julius and Augustus Caesar, Cleopatra and the discrepancies between the real histories of Greek, Rome and Egypt and the way blockbuster movies portray them. The man was a living history book.

“You have so much knowledge!”

“I read a lot. When I was a kid I was diagnosed with ADHD and I told my dad I didn’t like the way the medication made me feel, so he told me I didn’t have to take it. I remember my dad pointing out a bird with a broken foot, and he told me, ‘See that bird? You don’t see him begging. Even though he has a disability, he doesn’t ask for help from anyone. He just finds a way.’ So I decided that I was going to train myself to read for an hour every day to help myself focus. My dad got me an egg timer, and it was really hard, but I made it happen. I read everything now.”